Come Study with Me!

After receiving countless emails each year from students around the country who can’t study Politics & Society because that subject isn’t offered in their schools, (or where the existing classes were over-subscribed) I’ve finally worked out a way to make this possible. I’ve found it quite dispiriting that I haven’t previously been in a position to help those highly motivated students who have a real interest in and aptitude for the new subject, which I’ve long felt to be a real game changer when it comes to education in Ireland.

Rather than just the normal “grinds” class that I’ve been delivering in the Institute of Education in Leeson Street for the last 4 years, I’ve teamed up with their tech team to offer a chance for students to study the subject online over a one-year period that gets as close as possible to the experience as being in a ‘bricks and mortar’ secondary school classroom.

It can’t replicate the in-person experience completely, but the approach we will take is designed to maximize the flexible opportunities presented by the online environment, while trying to minimize some of the drawbacks that we all experienced during our periods of ‘lockdown learning’.

This is a class designed for highly motivated students who want to study with the best materials possible, but who are also willing to supplement classroom activities with detailed, consistent, independent learning.

What will this involve?

  • A weekly 2-hour class on Tuesday evenings
  • In class discussion, debate, and interaction
  • Weekly assessments, writing tasks, and feedback
  • Periodic ‘on-site’ sessions in Dublin focused on preparation for the Citizenship Project (submitted around the Easter Holidays), essay writing, and data-handling
  • “Christmas” and “Mock” exams with feedback and reporting similar to a regular class
  • Essay preparation, Exam Analysis, Study Tips and Strategy

Class participation, debate, discussion are central to this process, particularly for students who need to develop their ability to respond coherently and authentically to discursive essay titles in a pressurised “exam setting”. This won’t be a sit back and relax kind of class!

For more details, such as the schedule of classes and assessment information, follow this link to the Institute’s website where you can take a sample class, visit their FAQs, and book in for the year.

***Please bear in mind that there will be some ‘terms and conditions’ associated with this course, particularly the need to have a cooperating teacher in your school with whom I can coordinate the submission of your projects and written confirmation from your school’s Principal that it will be possible for you to sit the final exam during the exam period next June.***

Combined “Listen-Along” Guides

I’ve compiled all 13 of the listen along guides into one pdf that you can download below. My hope is that this will make it a little easier for students (and teachers) to keep track of their work, and even to refer back to the episodes when you need qualitative and quantitative evidence for essays.

The document is only about 50 pages long, so should be manageable on school photocopiers.

If I do ever get around to more episodes (it has been very busy lately!) I can add them as I go.

I hope they’re of use in the new school year.

PolSoc Podcast Listen Along Guides – Combined

Best of luck with the return to school later this month!

JD

Hot off the presses!

Well, after a very busy year and a lot of head scratching, my latest offering “Dealing with Data – the Essential guide to Data-Based Question in Politics and Society” has finally made its way into the world. I’m very grateful to the other teachers who helped me to get this from the initial concept to the finished product.

The main goal with the book is to try and make teachers and students’ lives just a little bit easier in the classroom by having as many key concepts linked to sample data-based questions as possible. It’s designed to be both exam practice and building up key skills for essays & project work.

In there you’ll find:

 

·      Key Concepts, terminology, and methodology ideas and class exercises

·      16 Sample Data-Based Questions (4 OL, 12 HL)

·      Links to regularly updated data sources that are tailored to the Pol-Soc course

·      and some ‘exemplar’ answers to try and provide some guidance to students as to how they can approach different question types.

As always, I’m all ears when it comes to any suggestions and (constructive) feedback. Hopefully, people will find it useful in the classroom.

There’s also a special promotion: Buy ‘Dealing with Data’ and ‘A Little Bit of Media Analysis’ for €39.99 when you use code “BUNDLE” (ALL CAPS) at checkout!

https://www.mcandrewbooks.com/product-page/dealing-with-data-paperback

JD 18/07/2022

data headshot pic

 

The French Presidential Elections – A Multi-Strand Case Study (Boxing Smart before the exam!)

Continuing with the overall theme of the resources on this site, here’s a “classroom ready” handout on the recent French Presidential Elections. Now, I’m obviously aware that case studies like this will quickly become obsolete, but what I’m keen to focus on is the need to try and equip students with materials that touch on multiple ‘stands’ of our course (like the Indian Farmer Protests, which luckily – from the perspective of the students, not the farmers!- is still ongoing). To that end, the first page of the handout is an attempt to link the topic to 8-9 different areas on the course where even a brief reference to the data that students can gather around the outcome of the election could be applied.

I’ll include a pdf and MS Word version so that you can tinker with it to make it useful for your own students in their particular context…

French Elections 2022 Case Study – PDF

French Elections 2022 Case Study – MS Word

Maybe it’ll be useful as an “alternative/comparative” perspective paragraph in an essay on “Selecting an Executive”, maybe a brief reference to “Les Gillets Jaune” will link in with protest movements and ‘consent of the governed’, maybe the impact of globalization on French de-industrialization that has left many former blue-collar workers disillusioned with neoliberalism with be used as evidence in a “Globalization and Localization” essay for Thomas Hylland Eriksen or a brief link to Kathleen Lynch, maybe it’ll just be a single line in an essay on French identity and the impact of migration….

But for all those different areas, they’ll still need to have well-sourced content that they can evaluate and engage with. And in all cases, some hard and fast data can only strengthen their responses.

A final exercise that you might enjoy doing, but which I haven’t included on the handout would be attempting to ask the students how they think each of the 17 Key Thinkers would have responded to the result of the elections (rounds 1 and 2). I’d say Marx would be pretty disappointed that Jean-Luc Mélenchon didn’t make it to the run off!!!!

I hope you find the resource useful and that it might spark students into a broader engagement with some of the sub-headings in the multiple strands of the course.

Best of luck with the run in to the exams – Remember, anyone can hang on for four and a half weeks!

JD 4/5/22

A “One-Essay” Exam – recalibrating students’ expectations

I know that the site has been somewhat quiet recently. All I can say is sorry. Things have been exceptionally busy of late. I’d love to have been producing more materials, but I also know that I have to find some space to not completely burn out (again…)

But one topic that has animated me somewhat in recent weeks (since the return to just ONE essay in the exam) is the idea of how to recalibrate the students’ expectations as to what level of depth and detail is required. Speaking to a few other Pol Soc teachers recently, I would say that this seems to be an issue in a few different classrooms. Some of my students now seem to think that the essay they write in June has to be about 6-8 pages with the accompanying level of detail. (i.e. twice the length and depth as before…). It was all I could do to dissuade them!

Now, I clearly am not an SEC examiner, but I have developed a mild skill in “reverse engineering” the application of SEC marking schemes over the last few years. So what might that kind of insights might that approach yield…?

One of the student questions that I struggled to answer over the years is “What does a H1 essay look like in this subject?” Well, last year I had a truly amazing student who got 99½% in the exam (full marks in every other section and 98/100 in the exam), so I now have a pretty good idea of what a “near perfect exam essay” looks like. Please note, that I’m not saying it’s a perfect essay, but rather that it’s pretty clear that it touches on all of the requirements of the exam essay marking scheme. I also say “a” near perfect essay (there’ll be lots of ways to skin that particular cat…)

I present it below (both blank and annotated with my own comments as I have done previously) NOT to say that students should learn it by heart, but rather to illustrate the ways in which the approach I suggested in a previous PASTAI CPD session in January 2022 (about addressing the “Is Ireland a Patriarchy?” question) were somewhat vindicated. Virtually all of the material that the student presented in the essay were drawn from class activities and combined with the research of her group members and herself.

98 per cent Feminism SEC Exam essay 2021 Blank

98 per cent Feminism SEC Exam essay 2021 Annotated

But more importantly, I’d suggested students look at the structure of the essay. What would I point out to them in a general sense?

  • This student took the extra time to PLAN here essay more precisely than she might otherwise have had the time to do. (Remember, 30% of the marks are for the INTRO and COHESION – i.e. structural factors)
  • It’s 4½ pages (meaning that the don’t have to just throw the kitchen sink at the question)
  • See how the student balanced her knowledge of the Key Thinkers and their Terminology with the other aspects of the essay
  • The student balanced the use of Qualitative and Quantitative evidence in different paragraphs as she felt appropriate
  • She uses credible, relevant, and recent sources at a number of different points
  • Each paragraph has a personal perspective that is appropriate to the content she has discussed.

And most importantly:

  • She always demonstrates how the evidence she provides can be framed as a direct response to the specific terms of the question asked…

I know that this is a lot to juggle in an essay, but as I always tell my students: “In Pol-Soc, it’s not what you know, it’s what you can DO with what you know.” Obviously, this must be grounded in detailed knowledge of the topics, concepts, and case studies, but then she uses that material and ‘pivots’ it to address the terms of the question.

I was delighted to see this student (who really was exceptional) get rewarded for what looks like a really insightful essay. I find that so encouraging.

It’s also worth saying that I know for a fact that not all my students engaged with the original task with the same focus and alacrity when we covered that Learning Outcome in 5th year, but at least I get to stick to my own version of the ‘Hippocratic Oath’ – Primo non Nocere – “First, do no harm”. In other words, I may not have done everything right in the classroom (I doubt I ever will), but as least I wasn’t so bad as to stop a great student achieving her potential…

Anyway, I hope the essay is useful and that it gives you and your students some insight into what the top end of the grading looks like in a “one-essay exam” (remembering that a sample size of ONE is pretty limited!)

Best,

Jerome 7/3/22

PS – I am, of course, most grateful to the student in question who was happy for me to circulate her work if I felt it would help other teachers and students. I hope it does…

PASTAI – CPD Session 18/1/2022

Many thanks to those who attended yesterday’s CPD session, particularly for the thoughtful questions at the end. Sorry I don’t have more answers to the many ‘known unknowns’ of our course…

Find below the resources the I had worked on for the session. I’ll upload them here in MS Word and PDF format so that you can tinker with them to best suit your own needs. I’m also including a few links to earlier posts from previous CPD sessions (which I am terrible at archiving – sorry) that might be helpful. I’ve updated some of them recently, so hopefully they’ll be a little bit more focused. https://polsocpodcast.com/2021/11/15/teachmeet-essay-writing-resources-for-pol-soc-teachers/

The final thing is a link to the Google Form questionnaire on Teachers’ Experiences of Pol Soc that I’m working on as a research project. If people had the chance, and haven’t yet done so, I’d really appreciate the time (less than 10 mins) that teachers could give to complete it: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1JHxHs4pSr–vuiU4RwccGYrhcG2nkhN6O8IuBhUCRtE/edit#responses

Resources:

Health Inequality Mini Scheme of Work:

The Health Divide Documentary – Student Question Sheet with DBQ and Student Research Sheet PDF

The Health Divide Documentary – Student Question Sheet with DBQ and Student Research Sheet – MS Word

Essay-Writing PowerPoint: PASTAI – Essay Writing CPD Session – Jan 2022

Gender Across the Course Mind Map: Gender across the course

Alternative/Comparative Perspectives (with student example): Dealing with Counter-Arguments 2021-2 with example

Blank Essay Revision Grid: Blank Revision Essay outline – PDF Blank Revision Essay outline – MS Word

Essay Skills Development Grid: Study Skills for Pol Soc Essay

And don’t forget, if any of the newer teachers are struggling with a particular topic or issue, don’t hesitate to get in touch. There are plenty of people willing to help.

Best,

JD

19/1/22

The Two Popes (Netflix) – “Watch Along” Handout

It is crucial we pause to reflect on the level of innovation and creativity undertaken by the teaching profession during the pandemic.”

I read Deirdre McGillicuddy’s article in the Irish Times this morning about teacher creativity, and often think that the pressure to be creative can be one of the most tiring parts of being a teacher. Constantly trying to innovate and keep our lessons fresh is critical to our success, but also takes a psychological toll at times. (https://www.irishtimes.com/news/education/is-teacher-creativity-the-key-to-transforming-irish-education-1.4741006) Sometimes, we have to find imaginative ways of engaging our students. Other times, we have to just K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid – as they say in the US Marine Corp). Maybe today we can do a little bit of both!

It’s often in those moments of emergency (such as today’s storm) means we might have to “pivot” a class very quickly. I was hoping to show some sections of the Netflix movie The Two Popes today in class as a way of introducing Laudato Si, Fr Sean McDonagh, and Eco-Theology. Now we have to do it online. Links to the worksheet are below.

The Two Popes – Pol Soc “Watch Along” Handout

But it’s perhaps worth lingering on Dr McGillicuddy’s line “The power of teaching as creative endeavour lies in the transformative possibilities for children, teachers, schools, communities and our broader society”, to stop ourselves feeling to bad during a stressful day. It would be an interesting lens through which to view some aspects of the Pol-Soc course in general and The Two Popes movie more specifically.

Enjoy the rest of your storm day!

JD – 7/12/21

The Classroom Divide – Video and Activity Worksheet

It seems to me that there will be quite a bit of disruption to classes in the run up to Christmas. Between teachers and student absences due to Covid, it will be hard to have continuity with classroom debates and discussions. Back to students at home working independently might be a struggle for some… If you’re absent yourself, you could even assign this remotely!

So below you’ll find a worksheet I did up on Joe Duffy’s documentary “The Classroom Divide” which you’ll find back up on the RTÉ Player after a period while it wasn’t available…

There are MS Word and PDF versions of a student worksheet to jot down the key data, but with additional activities and space for a mind-map designed to show students how to link the idea of ‘Education’ across the different strands of the course. Adapt that handout (which fits well onto a back-to-back A3 sheet) as you see fit. There’s also a ‘teacher answer sheet’ which has most of the quantitative data answers and many of the relevant quotes just to make your life a little easier. Obviously, the students need to complete some of the larger boxes – presenting the different elements of the arguments – themselves, so I haven’t been prescriptive in how they should do that…

It’s important that students see how to take the data from the documentary and convert it into useable qualitative and quantitative data for their essays, but that’s something every teacher will approach in their own way.

Don’t forget to get them to offer a “Critical Evaluation” of the documentary in the final question on the page, because we always have to keep our “Alternative and Comparative Perspectives” in mind.

I’m hoping to complete a similar worksheet on The Health Divide, but it’ll depend on whether I get the time this week… I’ll pop it up here if I get that sorted.

Joe Duffy Documentary– The Classroom Divide – Student Worksheet PDF

Joe Duffy Documentary– The Classroom Divide – Student Worksheet MS Word

Joe Duffy Documentary– The Classroom Divide – Teacher’s Worksheet with answers PDF

Enjoy the Xmas ‘run-in’…

JD 6/12/2021

Pol Soc “Log Tables 2021-22” – Hot off the presses!

Find here the updated “Pol Soc Log Tables 2021-2022”. As I say in the introduction to the document, nothing here should be considered prescriptive, just my best attempt to help make the process of data-gathering and data analysis a little more accessible to students. Obviously, this focuses in on the various Index Rankings that students will be likely to see as they gather evidence for their essays. All the way through this process, I’m encouraging students to critically engage with these datasets in the following way…

They should ask themselves:

  • How would I critique the methodology of each data set?
  • What recommendations would I make to improve the usefulness of each data set?
  • Why is the number of countries in each data set important? Who has been omitted, and why?
  • How has Ireland’s relative position changed in these indices over time?
  • What other international trends are relevant or interesting?
  • And most importantly, how might I appropriately deploy the data within each of the indices into different exam essays?

In each case students might well come to different conclusions, and that’s fine, so long as they can give a reasonable justification for the ways in which they have interpreted the different data sets.

I’m hoping that teachers will be able to guide students through this process in a meaningful way and have included a few sample exercises, designed to help to solidify both personal engagement with data, and a critical evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of indices in general.

The most important thing that students should “take away” from this process, however, is the empty box at the end of each longer explanation of the data from pages 6-24. Make sure you are seeing which areas of the course, or which Key Thinker, or each SDG, that each index might most comfortably link to in an exam essay. Maybe there’s only 2-3 pieces of data that you’ll use in the final exam, but at least you’ll have engaged with that process in a critical manner.

If you do nothing else with this except quickly glance at the ‘Headline Data’ on page 2, then it might be 15 minutes of a Pol-Soc student’s time well spent.

As ever, I’m just giving my best guess as to what I think might be useful and will gladly engage with any “constructive criticism”…

I hope this helps!

Jerome

30 November, 2021.

‘Teachmeet’ Essay-Writing Resources for Pol Soc Teachers

With apologies for the blog having been so quiet over the last few months (teaching during Covid has really taken its toll, unfortunately), find below the resources that I was discussing during the PASTAI annual conference last Saturday. (Resources below…)

Before providing that stuff, though, two quick points…

  1. I want to express my enormous gratitude primarily to Bairbre Kennedy out in Malahide Community school (my old stomping ground) for her 3 years of service at the head of the teachers’ association. I know all too well how demanding that role can be and just how much work goes on behind the scenes to represent the best interests of the teachers (and by implication, the students). This obvious extends the committee as a whole. I’m looking forward to helping out in the background again as a committee member in the year to come. Best of luck to the incoming Executive!!!

The goal of the survey is to gather as much data as we can about the experience of teachers throughout the different cohorts as to their experiences of working in a new subject area. Hopefully, it can contribute to a meaningful output to catalogue our experiences and make recommendations as to the implementation of new subjects into the future. But we need to have a larger sample size to have more meaningful results. I appreciate how busy people are, but any time in the next couple of weeks, would be great…

Student Expectations“Reverse Engineering” what the SEC seem to be looking for…

As I mentioned in my talk on Saturday, one of the most frustrating aspects of the new subject in the first few years was not being in a position to tell students “What a H1 essay looks like…”). But now, at least, we’re getting to a place where we have at least some idea as to what the expectation levels are. Importantly, the essays and recommendations below aren’t prescriptive, (and certainly not to be learned by heart) but you’ll find some examples of essays completed in the actual Leaving Cert, marked by SEC examiners (I’m not an SEC examiner***). My former students have given permission for me to anonymize these essays and circulate them to help the upcoming generations of students. There are obviously LOTS OF WAYS to write a successful essay and teachers will have different techniques for achieving similar goals, but seeing how the SEC marks the stuff is at least interesting…

I’ve approached this task in what I hope will be a meaningful way. First, you’ll see the 4 BLANK essays, with no grades. Read through them and see what marks YOU think they should be awarded.

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 3b – Blank Essay

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 4 – Blank Essay

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 5 – Blank Essay

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 6a – Blank Essay

Then look at the annotated versions. I’ve included that I,K,E,A,V,C marking scheme grades from the SEC and the kinds of comments that I would have made if showing students how to improve on their essays overall. ***These are only my best guess at how they should be improved***, but that should be based on a reasonably well-informed level of insight into teaching essay writing over 20 years of English, History, and now Pol-Soc teaching.

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 3b – annotated with mark and comment

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 4 – Annotated with marks and comments

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 5 – Annotated with mark and comments

LC 2019 Politics and Society – Q 6a – Sample essay – with marks and comments

The final thing is a copy of the PPT that I used on Saturday which includes some sub-headings about the different types of essay questions that are being asked (again my own interpretation), how to structure an exam essay ‘Introduction’, and also how student might usefully engage with the stimulus material. For me, at the moment, it’s all about given students clear expectations as to what I’m expecting of them, and trying to align those expectations with what the SEC seem to be looking for… But as with all things on this website, this is just my best guss. I’d gladly take on board the insights of anyone who wanted to join in with this assessment (albeit, it’s clearly not the most exciting part of what we do on a day-to-day basis).

PASTAI – Essay Writing Presentation

I hope that these are of some practical use to teachers as we head towards the Christmas Exams and the Mocks with our 6th Years. If anyone has any other useful insights, I’d be delighted to incorporate them into this blog post. Just email and let me know!!!

Best of luck with the weeks ahead.